Letters to the Editor

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Flip-flopping opinion should have the facts
Editor:
I suppose I should take the time to respond to Reid Mowrer’s storyteller letter of Nov. 9, which begins with Mr. Mowrer’s “…surprise to find one very long letter…”(673 words) by Terry Mehaffey of which Mr. Mowrer starts his own letter (643 words) of hyperbolic and invective loaded complaints, bordering on a vendetta of sorts.
What struck me the weirdest was not Mowrer’s whining against the letter policy of the News-Bulletin (same for all contributors), but his loss of memory concerning his prior letter in which he forcefully attacked the concept of the media Fairness Doctrine, while whining in his current letter, and lamenting: “The lack of equal time is what bothers me” — the very essence of the Fairness Doctrine.
Some might call it flip flopping or, perhaps, sorta being forked-tongued.
Now is the time for definitions for terms often used. My computer-loaded dictionary has two definitions for the term storyteller: “a person who tells stories” and “a person who has lied or who lies repeatedly.”
In using the term, the problem is in knowing the difference between fiction and fact, between legend and myth versus reality — and using applied honesty.
Another closely related two definition term is “false witness, a person who lies during testimony (perjury)” and “a person who has lied or who lies repeatedly (prevaricator).” Again I return to Mr. Mowrer’s use of the word “integrity” as involves a storyteller and/or one who employs false witness (an abomination) on a regular basis.
I will stay away from Mr. Mowrer’s paragraph of God’s truth with the excepted mentioning of the facts that those horrors observed by Mr. Mowrer from human “slavery” to “the annihilation of six million Jews” were done by those who claimed righteous (morally justified) Christianity as their religion.
Well, that and a bit of Mowrer-type false witness when he accused me of: “… for which you condemn Him latter (sic) in your monotribe.”
Perhaps Mr. Mowrer is referring logically to the Mono tribe of Native Americans who live in the central Sierra Nevada Mountains and the Mono Basin. Anyway, I suppose Mr. Mowrer was trying to make reference to my mentioning the full support religiously (Christian) and politically (within law) for the institution of human slavery found in the text of the post secession constitutions of the Confederacy (the truth is in the reading and not pretending nor lying to one’s self.).
Mr. Mowrer conveniently left that part out of his, to borrow his own word, “monotribe.” Any false accusation in a “monotribe” will do, I suppose, when applying false witness.
Finally, when I write I often use quotes from past founders and thinkers with which I have learned to consider and to agree with the wisdom found. That is why when I consider Mr. Mowrer’s use of the humility absent absolutism of  his religious dictums I think of the words of C. S. Lewis, respected Christian philosopher and author: “It forbids them, like the inquisitor, to admit any grain of truth or good in their opponents, it abrogates the ordinary rules of morality, and it gives a seemingly high, super-personal sanction to all the very ordinary human passions by which, like other men, the rulers [religious absolutists] will frequently be actuated. In a word, it forbids wholesome doubt.”
And when I consider the estate/inheritance tax, I use and remind myself of the words of Adam Smith, author of “The Wealth of Nations” and the founding father of the capitalism/free market ideology. I understand why Adams considered the greatest danger from the ideology toward society being the inheritance of vast accumulated wealth (greed) (aristocracy built on inherited wealth ― think the Koch brothers, etc.), and why he said there should be no estates except for dependent children (an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure ― and helps to equalize power in society).
I also understand why such a tax is important to any democracy and why such a tax is the closest thing possible or allowable to the biblical concept of Year of the Jubilee.
Yet, Mr. Mowrer likens the logic and ideas of such long-honored views and thinkers, accurately quoted, to be “…the taxing thoughtless drivel in the letter’s column of the News-Bulletin.”
Integrity and logic? I rest my case!

Terry Mehaffey
Los Lunas