New doctor at Village Veterinary Hospital learns something new every day

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Brandon J. Herron, DVM, grew up like many boys in New Mexico, in a rural community, raising and showing livestock through 4-H and FFA.

Herron, who grew up on a cattle and sheep ranch in Roy, N.M., said he’s always enjoyed working with animals and livestock. He said there is no veterinarian in Roy, but by being in 4-H and FFA, he was able to experience how veterinarians are able to help an animal feel better, something he realized he too wanted to learn how to do.

Ungelbah Daniel-Davila-News-Bulletin photo: Veterinarian Brandon Herron says his time in 4-H and FFA while in high school helped him decide on his career.

So after high school, Herron enrolled at New Mexico State University, where he earned a bachelor’s degree in Animal Science and was honored as an Animal and Range Science distinguished graduating senior in the spring of 2007.

In veterinary school, Herron became a member of the American Association of Bovine Practitioners and the American Association of Equine Practitioners.

From there, he studied Veterinary Medicine at Colorado State University, where he graduated in 2011 before getting his first job as a veterinarian at Village Veterinary Hospital in Bosque Farms.

Village Veterinary is a mixed animal practice, meaning Herron gets to work on animals ranging from pets to livestock.

He said he choose to specialize in large animal medicine, but is able to work with pets, such as dogs and cats, too. In fact, he says one of his first jobs at Village Veterinary was performing a C-section on a dog giving birth to puppies.

He says his line of work is both challenging and rewarding because it is constantly changing.

“It’s a challenge,” Heron says. “You do switch to looking at dogs, cats, then running to look at a horse then babies ― it’s always changing.”

He says he’s always learning something new about veterinary medicine and that one of his favorite jobs is diagnosing horses with colic to find out where they are hurting and why.

“I might have to pull a book out, but I’ll be able to figure it out,” he said.

Herron says one of the best parts of his job is “being able to step right up and do a surgery or something that needs to be done.”

Village Veterinary, located at 250 Bosque Farms Blvd., offers services including, spay and neuter, emergency care, equine performance dentistry, internal medicine, laser surgery, radiology, ophthalmology, orthopedics, microchipping and more.

The hospital also does professional dental cleanings for dogs and cats, using their new digital dental x-ray.

According to their website, research shows that at around age 2, 70 percent of cats and 80 percent of dogs have signs of dental disease. If left unattended, dental disease can become fatal.

Signs of dental problems include, bad breath, yellow-brown crust on the teeth, red or bleeding gums, change in chewing habits and drooling.

For information or to schedule an appointment, call the Village Veterinary Hospital at 869-2627.


-- Email the author at udavila@news-bulletin.com.