Letters to the editor (03/14/12)

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Family thank those who helped with benefit
Editor:
Kevin Revak’s family wants to thank all of the people who gave there time, effort, love and prayers towards the fundraiser given to him at the Belen Elks Lodge No. 2499 on Feb. 12.
Thank you to Belen Elks Lodge No. 2499, Rutilio’s, All About You,  the Spanish Choir from our Lady of Belen, Bucklands Pharmacy, JoAnn’s Restaurant and family, Bethlehem Trading Post, Share-N-Care Pharmacy.
Southwest Emorium, Hair Innovations, Rita’s Restaurant, Tabet Lumber, Kristin’s Barber Shop, Beautiful Me, Subway, DJ, Ned’s, Belen Consumer Finance, Our Lady Of Belen, friends, family, neighbors, the community of Belen, and especially the News-Bulletin and KARS Radio, who really spread the word made it happen.
We appreciate you.

Kevin Revak Family
Jarales

(Editor’s note: The following letters were submitted by ninth-grade students at Calvary Chapel Academy in Belen.)

Valencia County needs a hospital, desperately
Editor:
Please hear my opinion on the hospital in Valencia County. It’s about a 45-minute stretch from here to the hospital in Albuquerque.
If someone is dying, odds are they won’t make it to the hospital in time to live. Valencia County is growing more and more each day. And we need to be able to stay close to home if we are hurt. There are enough hospitals in Albuquerque, but not one in Valencia County.
This concerns me. I have a lot of family that live in Los Lunas, and I’m concerned about their health.
The hospital would keep everyone here healthy. I understand we were about to have a hospital, but changed our minds, please consider our new hospital.

Lydiana Scott

Local people will be saved with hospital
Editor:
I think that Valencia County needs a hospital.
We have been told that there was going to be one built. There hasn’t been one built though.
This is a must-have thing in a small town like ours. People have to rush to Albuquerque to see a doctor.
This is not right, because what if it is an emergency?  What if they were dying and needed to be there now?
We could probably save some people if we had a hospital in the county.
My aunt, Katrina, died Jan. 8, 2009. She ate some steak and swallowed too much. She started to choke.
Her husband noticed her choking. He had his son call 911. He tried to save her, but nothing he was doing was helping.
The ambulance did not know where her house was. They finally found the house. They loaded her into the vehicle.
They were doing procedures on her in the vehicle, but nothing was helping. She arrived at the hospital in Albuquerque. They pronounced her dead. The doctor in the vehicle said, “She passed before she got to the hospital.”
The doctors could have had a better chance at saving her life if we had a hospital in town. If this happened to my family, it can also happen to yours.
We must have a hospital in Valencia County.

Dylan Garner

We need a place for off-roading
Editor:
I think that Valencia County is in need of an off-road vehicle park.
The state has all of these rules on how we can’t ride in certain areas and we need to ride in designated areas.
Where is Valencia County’s designated area?
The county needs to have an off-road park. If they provided one, they wouldn’t have so many people riding in “undesignated areas.”
It would be safer for people to be in an area specifically designed for off-road vehicles.
Riders won’t have to worry about things that shouldn’t be there; for example, people riding horses or walking their dogs.
Most importantly, riders won’t be breaking state rules. I think that having this designated area could resolve a lot of problems.
It would make people, like me, who are serious about riding, happy.

Austin Powell

Schools need to improve in county
Editor:
One thing I strongly believe Valencia County could improve on is the schools.
Our schools are full of drugs and people that don’t care to try. The schools have become just a place of friends and not what they are for: to learn and to equip the future generation with the things they need to make it in the real world.
Our generation is verily rapidly going nowhere; kids barely make it out of high school. Many don’t even make it out of high school; a large percentage drop out.
What does this say for our future, not only as Valencia County, but the state or even the country — a state or country full of people that can barely even make it with their minimum wage job, much less help the economy or create new medicines that we need?
This is one of the major things I believe we, Valencia County, needs to start to change and improve.

Raymond Jaramillo

Peralta is in need of a turning lane
Editor:
We need a turn lane through Peralta on N.M. 47.
There are so many times when someone is trying to cross the road and they almost get hit or even get hit. There is a stretch of road that is about a mile long that doesn’t have a turn lane.
According to www.BetterBelen.com, Peralta was denied a turning lane for now, that was in Nov. 19, 2009.  The people of Peralta have been fighting for years to get a turn lane on N.M. 47.
The surrounding communities are growing and so is the town of Peralta. Trying to cross the highway can be difficult because of the traffic coming from the opposite direction.
The traffic going the same direction as you can hit you or the other cars if they swerve to avoid you.
I can’t remember all of the times that I’ve been in a car trying to turn and almost getting rear ended or almost getting hit by oncoming traffic.
I’ve seen so many people get hit, or almost get hit, trying to turn onto or off of N.M. 47. Over the past five or so years, it has gotten worse.
I have lived in Peralta most of my life. I grew up here. Any larger Peralta or the surrounding communities get, Peralta is going to need a turning lane.
We don’t need a sewer system or sidewalks, we need a turning lane through the town of Peralta.
The bigger the town, the more traffic and more accidents. This is why I think Peralta needs a turning lane.

Tiffany Roush

More enforcement needed on ditches
Editor:
I believe that there is a problem with crime in our ditches.
I know that there are fences that go in front of the ditch paths that are meant to keep illegal activity from happening, but I’m not sure they’re effective.
Where I live, there have been many stolen cars found by the ditch near our house, as well as even some missing persons.
I think that there is a quite simple antidote to this problem. If fences that are better enforced are placed in front of the ditch paths, then the ditch crime rates would most likely go down.
Perhaps even some more police enforcement in those areas would solve the problem.
Crime in the ditches is a problem, and if the city would be willing to fix it, the county could be improved.

Veronica Mulvaney

Abandoned buildings will increase crime
Editor:
I believe an area of concern in Valencia County is the many abandon buildings we, the citizens, see when just driving down the road.
I do not believe it is healthy for these buildings to be abandoned. One reason is because, quite frankly, it looks as if our city is in dire need of rehabilitation.
The second is because leaving these buildings forsaken leaves opportunity for drug-dealing sites to increase.
There are a variety of solutions available for this need. Either tearing down or fixing up these buildings can expand Valencia County’s horizons.
As a citizen of Valencia County, I ask that something is done about these abandon buildings.

Alissa Triplett

Theater could double as soup kitchen too
Editor:
As I was looking through the weekend edition of the News-Bulletin, I noticed that the Mansion Players (a local theater acting group) was holding a workshop at the Belen Public Library.
That got me thinking. Why isn’t there a local theater for performing artists?
Then the idea came to me: a community arts center where local bands, dancers and actors can perform.
But wait, this idea has another part to it. When the facility isn’t being utilized by artists, it can be used as a community soup kitchen. So when groups want to use the building, instead of paying to perform there, they must help at the soup kitchen.
The public admission fee to watch the performances can be $5 each to help with building maintenance and costs, and people must also bring a canned food to help support the soup kitchen.
Performances can be held at night, and during the day it can be a soup kitchen. As a high school student, I think this will cultivate local artists my age, as well as serve people in our community.

Anna Padilla

Foster program is in need of help
Editor:
I just wanted to know where the better foster care programs are for the county.
I know we have some, but they are making the lives of the foster parents and the foster kid’s way more difficult than they need to be.
We need better foster care laws that protect the kids coming from drug addicted parents, abusive or neglecting homes or just on the street. If they come from any of the environments stated above, their parents should lose all rights to them unless the problem is resolved under strict safety conscious parameters to ensure the kid is no longer under the influence of those hazardous lifestyles.
According to www.Adoption.com, the state is supposed to reimburse the foster parents for any expense they pay out of their pockets for the foster kid(s).
But according to www.Adoption.com, we aren’t meeting the reimbursement rate. I find this a concern because it is a turnoff for those who wish to foster, but can barely afford the amount of people they are paying for now.
If the state really wants to get these kids into better homes they would be making the reimbursement, stricter applicant checks, and stricter guidelines for getting custody of these kids a priority.
We need to protect our kids. Because after all, aren’t they our future?

Moriah Kerns