BHS and electrical engineering graduate to begin work at MIT this fall

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David Romero, a 2009 graduate of New Mexico State University, was recently accepted into the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Romero is from Belen, and is a graduate of Belen High School.

David Romero, a 2009 graduate of New Mexico State University, was recently accepted into the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Romero is a graduate of Belen High School.

After having worked at MIT’s Lincoln Laboratory, a federally funded research and development center, Romero received a Lincoln Scholars Fellowship for graduate studies.

“I’m looking forward to this opportunity to further develop my research skills,” Romero said. “I’ll begin by pursuing the master’s degree, and then will decide whether to go on to the Ph.D. (program) in electrical engineering.”

In his current position at Lincoln Laboratory, Romero works with a group whose primary focus is developing algorithms for novel wireless communication systems. The work isn’t just theoretical; the group routinely tests their ideas through experiments.

Romero spoke highly and fondly of NMSU’s professors — Phillip DeLeon, in particular.

“Through him I got the opportunity to start my research early,” Romero said. “I was a research assistant of his and decided that’s what I wanted to do. There are a lot of opportunities like that at NMSU for students to work with faculty.”

DeLeon described Romero as an extremely talented student, and said that his accomplishment emphasizes the dedication of the NMSU teaching staff.

“David was an outstanding student,” he said. “I think his achievement shows how in-demand our students are. He showed an interest in signal processing and he comes to NMSU to recruit periodically. This speaks very well of our faculty.”

Romero also credited DeLeon, a Klipsch School of Electrical and Computer Engineering professor, for piquing his interest in Lincoln Laboratory.

While in DeLeon’s signals and systems course, Romero met a former NMSU student who was working at Lincoln Laboratory. After hearing about what she did, he attended a career fair to gain more information.

“That’s one of the great things about NMSU,” he said. “Students routinely get the chance to talk to potential employers.”