Think before lighting fireworks

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It’s fireworks season again. And again, fire officials are warning everyone to be careful when using them.
It’s not rocket science people! Valencia County and the rest of the state is dry, and it’s just not a smart move to light fireworks.
Last week, the Valencia County Commission held an emergency meeting after Gov. Susana Martinez implored county and local governing bodies to ban certain types of fireworks. Thankfully, the commission took notice and passed a proclamation banning the sale or use of aerial and ground audible devices and display fireworks.
According to the proclamation, display fireworks are defined as devices aimed for commercial displays to create visible or audible effects through combustion, deflagration or burning quickly before releasing sparks or detonation.
These fireworks include firecrackers holding more than 130 milligrams of explosive material, aerial shells with more than 40 grams of chemical materials intended for lift charge and any other items exceeding the limit for allowable fireworks.
The fireworks that are allowed to be sold or used must be ignited on a paved or barren area with a readily accessible source of water. And if you have to light fireworks this year, only cone fountains, crackling devices, cylindrical fountains, flitter sparklers, ground spinners, illuminating torches, toy smoke devices, wheels and mine fireworks are allowed in the unincorporated areas of the county.
In most municipalities in the county, firework ordinances have already been adopted years ago. Most of them don’t allow fireworks that shoot more than 10 feet in the air.
This is an important folks. Our properties and our lives are at stake here. Why take a chance of burning up someone’s home for a few measly seconds of fun? It’s not worth the risk.
Last year, the governor asked the Legislature to pass a bill that would allow her to take action and ban all fireworks if needed. Because the bill failed, so did our hope that New Mexico won’t burn down due to the recklessness of fireworks.
We urge everyone to go to the public fireworks displays this year — on Saturday, June 30, in Belen, and on the Fourth of July in Los Lunas — instead of lighting your own.
We need to do more to make sure that we are all safe, and we hope that this issue won’t end. We urge our local representatives to lead the charge and try again at next year’s legislative session.