Letters to the editor (03/06/14)

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Misinforming voters
Editor:
Recently, the city of Rio Communities Treasurer Gordon Warrick submitted a paid political advertisement in the Valencia County News-Bulletin (Feb. 20) that in my opinion could be considered slanderous, and at the very least, unethical and in conflict of city employee standards. It also (could) be an election code violation.
Mr. Warrick used his title as city treasurer openly and used the mayor’s name, Mark Gwinn, and two city of Rio Communities elected officials names, Cyndi Sluder and Frank Stasi, in endorsing his personal political agenda, making a non-partisan election partisan.
In addition, Mr. Warrick’s descriptions of candidates for office is obviously condescending in his assertions of alcohol use for information of a candidate retired (who was not removed from office).
Secondly, his unfounded allegations of another candidate “having never been certified as a law enforcement officer.” This individual retired from the state PERA, not the county, prior to becoming a Valencia County administrative undersheriff.
Obviously, the facts are meaningless in this election, but the continued controversy that presently exists is being endorsed by an employee of the city of Rio Communities (who is) spreading propaganda and getting citizens upset and misinformed.

Arturo Sais
Rio Communities

Drones are killing people
Editor:
Another drone strike killed 12 and wounded 14 innocent people traveling to a wedding in Yemen on Dec. 12, 2013.
This attack is outright murder, in the name of the citizens of the United States, of people who have never done us any harm and who did not intend to harm us. That is, they did not until now. Since the killings, a wave of outrage has swept across Yemen.
It seems that our government doesn’t care how many enemies we create because of willful carelessness of the lives of innocents in our “war on terror.”
In fact, it is America that is perceived as the terrorist by those who are suffering from these attacks.  And they feel this way for good reason. Many other similar incidents could be cited.
For example, on Sept. 2, 2012, a U.S. drone hit a minibus near Radda full of villagers carrying their day’s shopping home. The Yemeni government reported that all 12 killed were civilians. Among the victims were a pregnant woman and three children.
Another disaster occurred on Dec. 17, 2009, when President Obama authorized his first attack in Yemen.
A Tomahawk cruise missile shattered the peaceful village of al-Majala killing more than 40 people, including 22 children and 12 women. The missile carried cluster bombs, multiple flying land mines that shredded the victims into small pieces.
However horrible these weapons are for those on the receiving end, they are very profitable for their producers.
For example, Raytheon, a company that specializes in building weapons like the Tomahawk missile, had sales in 2011 of $25 billion, and it received a contract for $254.6 million to produce more Tomahawks in fiscal year 2013.
More than 2,000 of these Tomahawk missiles have been launched against people around the world.
The United States has become a warfare state that depends on ever-increasing government spending for weapons. Missile strikes that kill innocent civilians only create more enemies, generating a recurring cycle of violence that is then used to justify new lucrative contracts for the merchants of death like Raytheon.
I think there are better ways to use these billions of dollars here at home that could be of much more benefit to all the people of this country.

Gary Werner
Los Lunas